People

Stefanie A. DeLuca

Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins University

Stefanie DeLuca completed her undergraduate work at the University of Chicago (AB’97), where she studied psychology and sociology. She finished her Ph.D. in Human Development and Social Policy at Northwestern University in 2002. DeLuca’s current research uses interdisciplinary frameworks and multiple methodologies to examine the sociology of education, urban sociology, neighborhoods, and social inequality in the life course. Her research also involves sociological considerations of education and housing policy. She is interested in rigorous research designs for causal inference using both experimental and non-experimental data, as well as the use of qualitative work to understand causality and the effectiveness of social policies. DeLuca’s major areas of research have focused on the determinants of educational attainment; the role of noncognitive skills; the transitions to work for young people who do not attend college; the role of housing, neighborhood and social context on youth and family outcomes; patterns of youth residential mobility, and how mobility relates to changes in family, school, and neighborhood context. She is the recipient of a William T. Grant Foundation Scholars award for her research on housing.

Stefanie A. DeLuca

Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins University

Stefanie DeLuca completed her undergraduate work at the University of Chicago (AB’97), where she studied psychology and sociology. She finished her Ph.D. in Human Development and Social Policy at Northwestern University in 2002. DeLuca’s current research uses interdisciplinary frameworks and multiple methodologies to examine the sociology of education, urban sociology, neighborhoods, and social inequality in the life course. Her research also involves sociological considerations of education and housing policy. She is interested in rigorous research designs for causal inference using both experimental and non-experimental data, as well as the use of qualitative work to understand causality and the effectiveness of social policies. DeLuca’s major areas of research have focused on the determinants of educational attainment; the role of noncognitive skills; the transitions to work for young people who do not attend college; the role of housing, neighborhood and social context on youth and family outcomes; patterns of youth residential mobility, and how mobility relates to changes in family, school, and neighborhood context. She is the recipient of a William T. Grant Foundation Scholars award for her research on housing.

Kathryn Edin

Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Johns Hopkins University

Kathryn Edin is one of the nation’s leading poverty researchers, working in the domains of welfare and low-wage work, family life, and neighborhood contexts. A qualitative and mixed-method researcher, she has taken on key mysteries about the urban poor that have not been fully answered by quantitative work: How do single mothers possibly survive on welfare? Why don’t more go to work? Why do they end up as single mothers in the first place? Where are the fathers and why do they disengage from their children’s lives? How have the lives of the single mothers changed as a result of welfare reform? Edin has authored 7 books and some 60 journal articles. The hallmark of her research is her direct, in-depth observations of the lives of low-income women, men, and children. Edin is the Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. Formerly, she was Professor or Public Policy and Management at the Harvard Kennedy School and chair of the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality and Social Policy. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Margaret Mead Fellow at the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. She is a Trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation and on HHS’s advisory committee for the poverty research centers at University of California Davis, University of Wisconsin, and Stanford University. She is a founding member of the MacArthur Foundation-funded Network on Housing and Families with Young Children and a past member of the MacArthur Network on the Family and the Economy. Edin is currently faculty director of Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative, a signature initiative aimed at unlocking the potential of America’s revitalizing cities.  twodollarsaday.com  doingthebestican.com  21cc.jhu.edu

Kathryn Edin

Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Johns Hopkins University

Kathryn Edin is one of the nation’s leading poverty researchers, working in the domains of welfare and low-wage work, family life, and neighborhood contexts. A qualitative and mixed-method researcher, she has taken on key mysteries about the urban poor that have not been fully answered by quantitative work: How do single mothers possibly survive on welfare? Why don’t more go to work? Why do they end up as single mothers in the first place? Where are the fathers and why do they disengage from their children’s lives? How have the lives of the single mothers changed as a result of welfare reform? Edin has authored 7 books and some 60 journal articles. The hallmark of her research is her direct, in-depth observations of the lives of low-income women, men, and children. Edin is the Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. Formerly, she was Professor or Public Policy and Management at the Harvard Kennedy School and chair of the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality and Social Policy. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Margaret Mead Fellow at the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. She is a Trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation and on HHS’s advisory committee for the poverty research centers at University of California Davis, University of Wisconsin, and Stanford University. She is a founding member of the MacArthur Foundation-funded Network on Housing and Families with Young Children and a past member of the MacArthur Network on the Family and the Economy. Edin is currently faculty director of Johns Hopkins University’s 21st Century Cities Initiative, a signature initiative aimed at unlocking the potential of America’s revitalizing cities.  twodollarsaday.com  doingthebestican.com  21cc.jhu.edu

Timothy Nelson

Senior Lecturer, Johns Hopkins University

Timothy Nelson is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology and a Research Associate in the Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. He was previously a lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. He is the author of numerous articles on low-income fathers and is the co-author, with Kathryn Edin, of the book Doing the Best I Can: Fatherhood in the Inner City, published in June 2013 by the University of California Press. Currently, Nelson is working on a book with Kathryn Edin and Laura Lein (University of Michigan) on the work and child support experiences of 440 low-income fathers interviewed across four metropolitan areas: Philadelphia, Charleston, SC, Austin and San Antonio. He is also working with Andrew Cherlin (Johns Hopkins University) on a project examining the intersections of family, work and religion in the lives of working-class fathers. Nelson’s prior research has focused on African American religion and congregational studies. His prior book, Every Time I Feel the Spirit: Religious Experience and Ritual in an African American Congregation was published by NYU Press in 2004. Nelson received his PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago in 1997 and has taught at Northwestern University and the University of Pennsylvania.  doingthebestican.com

Timothy Nelson

Senior Lecturer, Johns Hopkins University

Timothy Nelson is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology and a Research Associate in the Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. He was previously a lecturer in Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. He is the author of numerous articles on low-income fathers and is the co-author, with Kathryn Edin, of the book Doing the Best I Can: Fatherhood in the Inner City, published in June 2013 by the University of California Press. Currently, Nelson is working on a book with Kathryn Edin and Laura Lein (University of Michigan) on the work and child support experiences of 440 low-income fathers interviewed across four metropolitan areas: Philadelphia, Charleston, SC, Austin and San Antonio. He is also working with Andrew Cherlin (Johns Hopkins University) on a project examining the intersections of family, work and religion in the lives of working-class fathers. Nelson’s prior research has focused on African American religion and congregational studies. His prior book, Every Time I Feel the Spirit: Religious Experience and Ritual in an African American Congregation was published by NYU Press in 2004. Nelson received his PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago in 1997 and has taught at Northwestern University and the University of Pennsylvania.  doingthebestican.com

Eva Rosen

Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Eva Rosen is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Department of Sociology, at the Poverty and Inequality Research Lab (PIRL) at Johns Hopkins University. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard University and is a member of the Scholar Strategy Network. Rosen’s research examines the creation, experience, and persistence of urban poverty, focusing on housing policy and racial segregation. Her research interests include urban sociology, poverty and inequality, ethnography, race & ethnicity, immigration, social policy, culture, and crime. Research projects have studied populations including relocated residents of former public housing on Chicago’s South Side, families displaced by Hurricane Katrina (the RISK study), and participants in the Baltimore’s Moving to Opportunity (MTO) experiment. Her current research focuses on landlords and low income housing in three cities. She is writing a book, under contract with Princeton University Press, examining the residential decisions and everyday lives of families living in a Baltimore neighborhood with high rates of housing voucher use. She will join the faculty at the Georgetown McCourt School of Public Policy in the summer of 2017.  evarosen.org

Eva Rosen

Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Eva Rosen is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Department of Sociology, at the Poverty and Inequality Research Lab (PIRL) at Johns Hopkins University. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard University. She is a member of the Scholar Strategy Network. Rosen’s research examines the creation, experience, and persistence of urban poverty, focusing on housing policy and racial segregation. Her research interests include urban sociology, poverty and inequality, ethnography, race & ethnicity, immigration, social policy, culture, and social theory. She relies on mixed methods including ethnography, quantitative data, and geographic mapping (GIS). Research projects have studied populations including relocated residents of former public housing on Chicago’s South Side, families displaced by Hurricane Katrina (the RISK study), and participants in the Baltimore’s Moving to Opportunity (MTO) experiment. Her dissertation was an ethnography examining the residential decisions and everyday lives of families living in a Baltimore neighborhood with high rates of housing voucher use. She is writing a book, under contract with Princeton University Press about recent changes in American housing policy that have transformed the landscape of ghetto poverty from high-rise public housing to vouchers, where the poor are housed in the private market. Rosen is co-PI on a project studying landlords in Dallas, Cleveland, and Baltimore, called “Landlords and the Geography of Opportunity.” Rosen has published papers in academic journals including City & CommunityThe Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, and The Annual Review of Law and Social Science. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Joint Center for Housing Studies, the Furman Center, and the Harvard Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality and Social Policy.  evarosen.org

Emily Warren

Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Emily Warren is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Poverty and Inequality Research Lab (PIRL) at Johns Hopkins University. She received her Ph.D. in Social Work from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2016. Warren’s research focuses on the impacts of housing insecurity and neighborhood disadvantage for low-income families and policies that can reduce housing-related poverty. Her recent research projects include the effects of income volatility on residential instability, the role of public housing authority preferences in allocating housing vouchers, and the value of the Earned Income Tax Credit for improving housing stability. Website: emilyjwarren.com.

Julia Burdick-Will

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University, School of Eductation

Julia Burdick-Will is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and the School of Education. She received her PhD from the University of Chicago, where she was an Institute for Education Sciences Predoctoral Fellow. Her research combines the sociology of education and urban sociology to study the roots of educational inequality and examine the dynamic connections between communities and schools that shape opportunities to learn both in and out of the classroom. She has studied the effects of concentrated neighborhood poverty on achievement as well as the relationship between neighborhood demographic change, changes in school-level achievement, and the geography of elementary school openings and closings. Her current projects focus on the impact of violent crime in neighborhoods and schools on student achievement and the relationship between neighborhood disadvantage and patterns of high school attendance and student mobility.

Julia Burdock-Will

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University, School of Eductation

Julia Burdick-Will is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and the School of Education. She received her PhD from the University of Chicago, where she was an Institute for Education Sciences Predoctoral Fellow. Her research combines the sociology of education and urban sociology to study the roots of educational inequality and examine the dynamic connections between communities and schools that shape opportunities to learn both in and out of the classroom. She has studied the effects of concentrated neighborhood poverty on achievement as well as the relationship between neighborhood demographic change, changes in school-level achievement, and the geography of elementary school openings and closings. Her current projects focus on the impact of violent crime in neighborhoods and schools on student achievement and the relationship between neighborhood disadvantage and patterns of high school attendance and student mobility.

Meredith Greif

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Meredith Greif is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. Her research focuses on homelessness, housing insecurity, homeownership, and neighborhood effects, both internationally and domestically. She currently studies how landlords’ business practices contribute to housing outcomes among lower-income and formerly homeless individuals, and explores models of stable, supportive housing for formerly homeless individuals. Her research also addresses how neighborhood and housing outcomes vary across racial and ethnic groups, and how they perpetuate intergroup inequalities. She received her B.S. degree in Rural Sociology from Cornell University and her PhD in Sociology from Penn State University. She has previously taught at Georgia State University and Cleveland State University.

Meredith Greif

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Meredith Greif is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. Her research focuses on homelessness, housing insecurity, homeownership, and neighborhood effects, both internationally and domestically. She currently studies how landlords’ business practices contribute to housing outcomes among lower-income and formerly homeless individuals, and explores models of stable, supportive housing for formerly homeless individuals. Her research also addresses how neighborhood and housing outcomes vary across racial and ethnic groups, and how they perpetuate intergroup inequalities. She received her B.S. degree in Rural Sociology from Cornell University and her PhD in Sociology from Penn State University. She has previously taught at Georgia State University and Cleveland State University.

Robert D. Francis

Doctoral Candidate, Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Robert Francis (Bob) is a doctoral student in Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include U.S. poverty and inequality, social policy, and rural communities. Currently, his primary project involves an examination of work and non-work among prime-age, working-class men in rural America. He was a 2015 University of Pennsylvania Summer Institute on Inequality Pre-Dissertation Fellow. His work has been awarded by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) and appeared in the edited volume Faith and Race in American Political Life. Before coming to Hopkins, Bob spent seven years doing advocacy and policy work in Washington, DC for several national faith-based organizations. He also spent many years in Chicago, where he worked as a junior high and high school teacher, case manager, and server of Chicago-style pizza. Bob holds a B.A. in Sociology and Theological Studies from Wheaton College (IL) and an M.A. in Social Science from the University of Chicago. Bob is a compulsive list maker, a proud resident of Steeler Nation, and an (occasionally) avid runner

Robert D. Francis

Doctoral Candidate, Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Robert Francis (Bob) is a doctoral student in Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. He has a wide range of research interests, including U.S. poverty and inequality, social policy, and small towns and rural communities. His current projects include extreme poverty in the United States, the functioning of TANF, the economic vitality of small towns, and non-work among prime-age men in rural America. Before coming to Hopkins, Bob spent eight years doing advocacy and policy work in Washington, DC. Before that he lived in Chicago, where he worked many jobs, including as a junior high and high school teacher, case manager, executive assistant, and server of Chicago-style pizza. Bob holds a B.A. in Sociology and Theological Studies from Wheaton College (IL) and an M.A. in Social Science from the University of Chicago. Bob is a compulsive list maker, a proud resident of Steeler Nation, and an (occasionally) avid runner. Originally from Pennsylvania, Bob lives with his wife and son in Arlington, Virginia.

Philip M.E. Garboden

Doctoral Candidate, Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Philip M.E. Garboden is a doctoral student in sociology and applied math at Johns Hopkins University. He holds a Master of Public Policy from the same institution. His work focuses on the ways housing policies intersect with the decisions of private landlords, developers, and tenants to impact low-income communities. At present, Garboden co-manages several large scale research projects including a three-city interview study of landlords and property managers, an in-depth ecological examination of neighborhood change in East Baltimore and Greater Homewood, a collaborative effort with Baltimore city to utilize administrative data to fine-tune urban policy, a mixed-methods study of the effect of housing mobility of Baltimore’s poor families, and a needs assessment of Baltimore’s J. Van Story Branch elderly and disabled public housing tower. He has received funding for these projects from the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Abell Foundation, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development.His research has been published in Housing Policy DebateCityscape, and the Annals of Political and Social Science philipgarboden.com

Philip M.E. Garboden

Doctoral Candidate, Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Philip M.E. Garboden is a doctoral student in sociology and applied math at Johns Hopkins University. He holds a Master of Public Policy from the same institution. His work focuses on the ways housing policies intersect with the decisions of private landlords, developers, and tenants to impact low-income communities. At present, Garboden co-manages several large scale research projects including a three-city interview study of landlords and property managers, an in-depth ecological examination of neighborhood change in East Baltimore and Greater Homewood, a collaborative effort with Baltimore city to utilize administrative data to fine-tune urban policy, a mixed-methods study of the effect of housing mobility of Baltimore’s poor families, and a needs assessment of Baltimore’s J. Van Story Branch elderly and disabled public housing tower. He has received funding for these projects from the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Abell Foundation, and the Department of Housing and Urban Development.His research has been published in Housing Policy DebateCityscape, and the Annals of Political and Social Science philipgarboden.com

Anna Rhodes

Doctoral Candidate, Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Anna Rhodes is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. She is a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellow, and recipient of a pre-doctoral fellowship from the Institute of Education Sciences. Her research explores the intersection of families’ school and residential choices to understand the role of housing, neighborhoods, and school contexts on children’s educational opportunities and outcomes. Her dissertation examines how low-income African American families, moving with a housing mobility program from an urban center to the surrounding suburban metropolitan area, navigate the process of adjusting to different school contexts, and the effect of this transition on students’ academic outcomes. Her work has been published in the edited volume “Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools,” Evaluation Review, and is forthcoming in the American Educational Research Journal. Rhodes has served as a project manager for the “How Parents House Kids” study in Cleveland, Ohio and the “Switching Schools and Navigating Neighborhoods” study in Baltimore, Maryland, managing teams of graduate and undergraduate research assistants conducting in-depth qualitative interviews. She holds a B.A. from Boston College in Sociology and Philosophy.

Anna Rhodes

Doctoral Candidate, Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Anna Rhodes is a Ph.D. candidate in Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. She is a National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellow, and recipient of a pre-doctoral fellowship from the Institute of Education Sciences. Her research explores the intersection of families’ school and residential choices to understand the role of housing, neighborhoods, and school contexts on children’s educational opportunities and outcomes. Rhodes has served as a project manager for the “How Parents House Kids” study in Cleveland, Ohio and the “Switching Schools and Navigating Neighborhoods” study in Baltimore, Maryland, managing teams of graduate and undergraduate research assistants conducting in-depth qualitative interviews. Her dissertation examines how low-income African American families, moving with a housing mobility program from an urban center to the surrounding suburban metropolitan area, navigate the process of adjusting to different school contexts, and the effect of this transition on students’ academic outcomes. Her work has been published in the edited volume “Choosing Homes, Choosing Schools,” and is forthcoming in the American Educational Research Journal. She holds a B.A. from Boston College in Sociology and Philosophy.

Christine J. Jang

Doctoral Candidate, Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Christine J. Jang is a doctoral student in Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. Her research interests include urban poverty, housing mobility, mixed-income neighborhoods, and social policy. For the past year, she has conducted systematic social observations, in-depth interviews, and ethnographic observations in East Baltimore. As part of a research team examining patterns of reinvestment, she observed the status of over 8,000 parcels to create a rich database of the housing landscape in the area. Furthermore, by focusing on Oliver – a revitalizing neighborhood in East Baltimore – she has gained a nuanced understanding of community building, social capital formation, and decision-making processes of housing investors. Before coming to Hopkins, she received a MA from Columbia University and BFA from Indiana University. She worked as a research assistant for various large-scale, multinational projects, including an evaluation of a United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) intervention in five different countries. She also organized advocacy actions as part of the Control Arms Campaign in support of the Arms Trade Treaty.

Christine J. Jang

Doctoral Candidate, Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Christine J. Jang is a doctoral student in Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. Her research interests include urban poverty, housing mobility, mixed-income neighborhoods, and social policy. For the past year, she has conducted systematic social observations, in-depth interviews, and ethnographic observations in East Baltimore. As part of a research team examining patterns of reinvestment, she observed the status of over 8,000 parcels to create a rich database of the housing landscape in the area. Furthermore, by focusing on Oliver – a revitalizing neighborhood in East Baltimore – she has gained a nuanced understanding of community building, social capital formation, and decision-making processes of housing investors. Before coming to Hopkins, she received a MA from Columbia University and BFA from Indiana University. She worked as a research assistant for various large-scale, multinational projects, including an evaluation of a United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) intervention in five different countries. She also organized advocacy actions as part of the Control Arms Campaign in support of the Arms Trade Treaty.

Allison Young

Doctoral Candidate, Sociology, Johns Hopkins University

Allison Young is a Ph.D. student in Sociology at Johns Hopkins University. Young has served as a project manager for a study of the Baltimore Housing Mobility Program, managing teams of graduate and undergraduate research assistants conducting in-depth qualitative interviews. She holds a B.A. from the University of Chicago in Anthropology.

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